Married to Your Company

Entrepreneurship can be tough. There are high highs and low lows that create stress, anxiety, and depression. There are many things you have to do for the first time, and you just have to figure it out, without a lot of guidance. There’s a time, energy, and monetary commitment necessary to go from idea, to product, to profitable company.

There’s no one I’d rather go through all of that with than Nate, which is why we’re founding our second company together. I know that there’s no one in the world that’s going to push me as hard to be the best in the world, and that’s what I need from a partner.

People ask us all the time how we work together without killing each other. I’m still surprised by the question, as I think the recipe for a successful co-founder relationship is not all that different from that of a successful marriage partnership. At the core, three things stick out in my mind: negotiating division of labor, open communication, and trust.

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Virtues and Intentions

I’ve been obsessed with the idea of leadership since I can remember. It always fascinated me to see who would step up in times of crisis, who would attempt to galvanize others, and who could bring out the best in people. This is why I spent my time in graduate school studying leadership and my time since applying those ideas to the workplace.

While reading new perspectives on leadership, I came across the site of Emily Bennington, and author and speaker, who encourages people to think about who they want to be (virtues and intentions) and not just what they want to do (goals).

She was inspired by Benjamin Franklin’s list of virtues to create a list of what matters most to her. I think about virtues as those ideas who are core to who you are and that don’t change regardless of the situation.

To go along with the virtues, she also created a list of intentions or ways she would enact those virtues.

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